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20130326
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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 10:00am EDT
government's effort throughout the clinton and in part of the bush administrations to degrade mortgage standards in order to increase home ownership. this contrary view was never put before the american people in time for its implications to be considered in the debate over dodd-frank. if that debate had occurred, it's unlikely that the dodd-frank act would have been enacted in anything like its current form. now, why did this debate not occur? why was there no competition in ideas on this matter? that is what i'll largely talk about today. for those not familiar with the argument that the financial crisis was caused by government policy, let me state it as succinctly as i can. before 1992 the vast majority of mortgages in the united states were prime mortgages with down payments of 10 to 20% and made to people with good credit records. fannie mae and freddie mac were the principal enforcers of these rules. delinquencies and defaults were few. in 1992 congress adopted legislation that required fannie and freddie to meet what were called affordable housing goals. the legislation initial
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 10:30am EDT
survey done during the clinton administration that claims 36% of gun transfers were done without a background. the president took the survey, rounded up, that the big problem is changing the term transfer. there's a big difference between god purchase. the vast majority of these transfers are within inheritance. i don't think it would've had quite the bite of the president said look, there's too many pairing given a gun to their kid it's not going through the proper regulation. it's not as scary as saying 40% of gun sales are going ahead. and this survey was done between november 9th 291 and december december 1994. it only involves 251 individuals , that's the other problem is most of the survey was done before it even went into effect. this survey is going all the way back to 1991. there's other problems i could point out with this, britishers ridley misleading. these are not going -- they would say about 13.3% and that's even though most of his theater time is done before you had the brady act going into effect. even 13.3% is much too high because gun sales have changed in so man
CSPAN
Mar 18, 2013 6:30am EDT
job he did in making us forget the things he did? >> at his funeral, bill clinton sort of said let's not judge, they will come a time when we don't judge his entire presidency by his one mistake. he was in public life or 50 years. i think they're taking a broader view of nixon now. the warp was johnson's war. he had told people the u.s. can't fool. he was a cold warrior. this was a great tragedy. 58,000 americans died in network, and 18,000 of them died while nixon was president. they didn't have to. but i don't think -- i think people will never forget what he did. so don't take it medicaid is the right word but i think we'll begin to see him for all his personal quirks, the farther the way -- away we get from them, the wider perspective that we are interesting view will have on them, i hope spent i disagree slightly with it. i think there was an effort made to alter public perceptions. i think richard nixon had a lot to offer as president on foreign policy. one of the things i have to say that richard nixon is he believed in the big play, or you call it a hail mary pass. he was wil
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 2:00pm EDT
about hamilton's history of womanizing. for example, bill clinton was not the first, and bill clinton was not the worst when it comes to misbehavior in high office. there's a long, long history of it. and eliot spitzer, arnold schwarzenegger, john edwards, these guys -- david petraeus had nothing on alexander hamilton. and what we find is if you read, for example, letters written by martha washington during those winter camps, she was tough. she was like a soldier. she didn't complain about the weather, she didn't complain about the harsh conditions, but she did complain about one thing. there was a tom cat one winter that was misbehaving, and it was noisy, noisy, and it kept her awake at night, so she nicknamed the tom cat alexander hamilton. [laughter] i also did a book a few years ago called "life in the white house," and it was about the presidents at ease. what do they eat? what hobbies do they have? what are they like as fathers and husbands? how did their their kids turn out? as another way of assess l presidential character, providing us with another lens. for example, we're a
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 10:00pm EDT
listened to, what you would want and you actually expect bill clinton it's not president obama to say. but privately he is grousing. do you see in the 50's a man that is at war with himself over what he believes? >> i can see that. one of the most interesting things following this thread of mixing and civil rights, i mentioned the trip to africa and 67, and that's where we met martin luther king, dr. martin luther king who was 28-years-old at the time and nixon they've really got along. particularly trying to see nixon to lobby for the administration you wanted to get to eisenhower. they said sure, come and see me. they met in washington at the office and they stayed in touch regularly. and king really felt they had a correspondence he was really admired pity and he had a good sensitivity about this. the one black man and eisenhower's white house salmon named fred mauro and he wrote a book called a black book in the white house and he felt completely sort of alienated. people he felt prejudice but he felt -- he said fred i don't think you should always be talking about job issues that
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 8:45am EDT
. >> never lost its punch. that is what hillary clinton said. i could have stayed home and baked cookies and people were appalled. >> i want to read a quote that speaks to this from "the feminine mystique: 50 years" which shows what was. as women move into the work place. she wrote another hazard a woman facing on her way out of attracting to hostility of other housewives. and over and over again said she was for choice. she did not say you must get a top level job. she said you need to be free to choose what kind of life you want which includes work or may not. she was not -- even though i looked at "the feminine mystique: 50 years" again, not very kind to the housewife staying home. i think politically she saw very quickly you cannot dismiss many hundreds and thousands of people, you have to respect them and make it possible for them to feel pride in themselves or they will come and kill you. >> you don't want to be denigrating. i don't think it is in feminism's interest or the interest of reality to be denigrating how difficult child care, that is work. >> i am very encouraged
CSPAN
Mar 25, 2013 1:00am EDT
with the clinton the eye or the disappointment something going on that has nothing to do that we're talking about that stops you from doing your assignment but i cannot do that unless i am with you. those of the changes i see and they worry me. >> host: finally, with your book "always on" u.s. the question how much to blame that can be laid at the feet of technology themselves? >> i do. with thin ice example of what i believe is the case my students are lousy with punctuation they don't have a clue what to do with us ; or:or a, a sprinkle them like croutons on a caesar salad. it is not their fault they say they rely on spell check. but kindergarten through high school did anyone really focus on spelling? no. because the faculty is thinking i need to focus on other things to be of modern skis. it is not the students' fault. if we change expectations of goals in education instead of reflecting were being by yourself and thinking and reading for a long period of time with no distractions if students don't know how to do it is not technology's fault, it is ours. one of my major concerns
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 11:30am EDT
, gates. and 73 in billionaires. and clinton is not a millionaire. smart money going into the land for peace, not influencing policymakers. and the city you are proposing may not be democratic but focusing on philanthropic efforts to change policies in ways that if you prefer is located. >> thank you. we will take a couple questions to take a picture. are you all waiting too was the back across. >> select four add another time. >> i am a journalist. i am attracted to the idea of cities trading information to see great ideas like transportation coming out of places like brazil. is the question about a whack of ideas, that we don't know what to do or going back to fraces fox piven's question behind her comments, the question of the power to get it done versus the power of those who profit from things not getting done. i would like to ask as a practical matter, you said the big issue was global warming. i would say the big issue is probably unique quality and the power, the world is brought to whitneits knees by banks run wi. how would you take on and correct the disaster of the excessive
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 9:00pm EDT
clinton did a lot of work on that as well to know what is going on in other parts of the world and be inspired by that. the protest and wisconsin on the collective bargaining issues there were young people holding up signs that say what why egyptian was a great way of showing that global connected mess. it's going on at the same time and was young people hanging up the signs having that solidarity's of that is a good way of thinking about on both ways both from the west to other countries and other countries back to the west that people are being inspired by their goebel peers. >> host: there has been criticism that young people haven't been engaged in politics in meaningful ways and maybe their engagement feels cursory or superficial. is that fair? >> guest: i don't think that's fair. if you look at the last cycles. the enthusiasm i would characterize in 2012 versus 2008 in terms of the number of young people going out campaigning and the number of people who are attending rallies was definitely decreased, but at the end of the day the voter participation was about the same. so, i th
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 10:00pm EDT
you think about part of that where joseph knight talks about smart power and hillary clinton did a lot of work on that as well, that culture and ideas and the ability for people to know what's going on in other parts of the world and be inspired by that. there's a lot of that going on in terms of exchange of ideas between global peers in the ability during the protests in wisconsin on the collective bargaining issues. they were young people who are holding up signs that said walk like an egyptian which i thought was a great way of showing that local connectedness. those people felt inspired by what was going on in the arab spring around the same time and there was some kind of -- young people holding up the signs having that solidarity so that's a good way of thinking about the ability to, both from the west to other countries back to the west that young people are inspired and engage with their global peers. >> host: there has been criticism that young people have not been engaged in politics, in meaningful ways and they be their engagement feels cursory or superficial. does that
CSPAN
Mar 17, 2013 9:00pm EDT
correspondent kim ghattas and her book, "the secretary: a joinny with hillary clinton from beirut to the heart of american power." in it, ms. ghattas examines ms. clinton's role and seeks to answer whether u.s. power is in decline. the program is about an hour. >> host: i think where we should begin is to talk a little bit about your biography, because i think as much as this book is about hillary clinton and her time as secretary of state, it's also about your experience from beirut to covering the secretary of state around the world. so why don't you just begin by talking a little bit about where you came from. >> guest: well, great. sure. jamie, thank you for having me, and i'm flighted by your first question because, of course, the biggest star in the book is hillary clinton herself, but this isn't just a biography of an historic woman, it's also a different take on the whole issue of american power. and as you mention, i come from beirut. i grew up there. i was born in beirut in the middle of the civil war in 1977, and i lived my whole life in lebanon, first 13 years in war and then
CSPAN
Mar 23, 2013 6:00pm EDT
effective at it. >> what do you think of bill clinton? >> i think bill clinton is probably the finest communicator that has ever inhabited the white house. i think that if they ever break down and invite me over there, as i've asked them to do on numerous occasions, i probably would have a great evening talking to him. i think he's probably one of the friendliest people that has ever occupied that office. but i do not believe that he is what he represents himself to be. i find, of all of the promises that he made during the campaign, virtually to be null and void. abortion, for example. he said he wanted to make them safe, legal, and rare. well, he certainly continues to make them legal, but anything but rare. and a number of other things. i mean, from the whole gay rights thing-- he told them one thing, he's doing another; to taxes, and the rest. so i think he realized that the country was not going to elect a liberal, so he put a conservative face on, but the truth is coming out now. >> talk from your perspective about the ronald reagan and his belief in god and non- churchgoing tha
CSPAN
Mar 18, 2013 12:00am EDT
ghattas and her book: the secretary, a journey with hillary clinton from beirut to the heart of american power." she conditions miss clinton's role, and whether u.s. power is in decline. the program is about an hour. >> where we should begin is to talk about your biography. i think as much as this book is about hillary clinton and her time as secretary of state, it's also about your experience from beirut to covering the secretary of state around the world. so, why don't you just begin by talking about where you came from. >> guest: great. thank you very much for having me. i'm delighted to be here and delighted by your first question. the star, the biggest star in the book is hillary clinton herself. but this isn't just a biography of an historic woman. it's also a different take on the whole issue of american power, and as you mention i come from beirut. i grew up there i was born in beirut in the middle of the civil tbhar 197- -- civil war in 1977 and i lived my whole life in lebanon, 13 years in war, and then the rest of the time, there was not exactly a stable country, so we've been
CSPAN
Mar 24, 2013 12:00pm EDT
. an interview with kim ghattas and her book, trailing. she examines mrs. clinton's role in u.s. diplomacy abroad and also seeks to answer by the u.s. power is in decline. the program is about one hour. >> host: i think we should begin is to talk about your biography. as much as this book is about hillary clinton at a time the secretary of state, it's also about your experience from beirut, the sector of state around the world. so why don't you become a talking about where you came from. >> guest: thank you very much for having me. i'm delighted to be here and and a lot of by your first question. the biggest are in the book is hillary clinton herself. but this isn't just a biography of a historic woman. it's also a different take on the whole issue of american power. as you mentioned i come from beirut. i grew up there. i was born in beirut in the middle of the civil war in 1977. i did -- spit my whole life in lebanon. first 13 years in war and then the rest of the time that some people may know, beirut is not exactly this table country. so we've been through many, many ups and
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)